Early withdrawal penalty

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Early withdrawal penalty

Penalty paid by the holder of a fixed-term investment penalizing an investor who withdraws money before the agreed-upon maturity date.

Early Withdrawal Penalty

A fee assessed on the withdrawal of funds from a fixed-income investment before the prescribed time. Early withdrawal may come from a certificate of deposit before its maturity. More often, however, early withdrawals refer to withdrawals from a retirement account before the appropriate age (usually 65 or date of retirement, whichever is greater). Early withdrawal penalties exist to discourage the frequent or abusive use of early withdrawals. As a result, early withdrawals usually occur when the account holder is in great financial need.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you take money out from your 401(k) account or IRA before you turn 59 1/2, you incur a 10% early-withdrawal penalty, in addition to having to pay income tax on the distribution.
It is not that you won't be able to access it, but you likely will have to pay an early-withdrawal penalty if you do.
An early distribution from a retirement plan can result in a 10% early-withdrawal penalty, but there is a smarter approach that avoids this penalty if these funds must be accessed.
To ensure that the IRS knows that the amount is not subjected to the early-withdrawal penalty, your IRA custodian/trustee should report the withdrawn amounts as death distributions.
On the flip side, withdrawing the money before you are 59 AaAaAeAe1/2AaAaAeAeAaAe typically trigger an early-withdrawal penalty of 10 percent.
Deposits that are subject to an early-withdrawal penalty of at least 50 percent of accrued interest can be treated as 'qualifying term funding,' or money that can be lent out, with effect from June 1.
Immediately after a layoff, you might be tempted to take out a no-penalty withdrawal from your 401(k) (no-penalty withdrawals are not subject to the 10% early-withdrawal penalty, and can be taken out for special circumstances such as a layoff or permanent disability), but it's still taxable income, says Perez.
* You have cash outside your retirement account(s) you can use to pay the conversion tax (so you don't have to pay a 10 percent early-withdrawal penalty).
For people with disabilities, the 10% early-withdrawal penalty is waived.
Even though converted amounts may be taxable, the 10% early-withdrawal penalty does not apply (IRC section 408A[d][3][A][i] and [ii]).
Taxpayers using a fixed annuity method to avoid an early-withdrawal penalty may make a one-time switch to a variable amount method based on the account's value.
Some in their 50s are heading for the exits even before they turn 59 1/2, the age at which they're eligible to access the funds in their IRAs and company retirement plans without paying an early-withdrawal penalty.