E-Mini

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E-Mini

A futures contract in which the underlying asset is a small portion of an index future, which is a futures contract where the underlying asset is a stock index. For example, an e-mini may represent a fraction of an index future on the NASDAQ 100. E-minis are more affordable and easier to sell than standard index futures. However, they are still speculative investments and subject to the same risks as other futures. As with other index futures, they are settled in cash. They are traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
References in periodicals archive ?
In July 2019--its third month of trading--volume in the four Micro E-mini futures, based on the S&P 500, Nasdaq-100, Russell 2000 and Dow Jones Industrial indexes, averaged 483,323 contracts a day, according to CME data.
The benchmark S&P 500 e-mini futures dropped 0.82% to the lowest the contract has traded since early March.
This total cumulative volume represents trading across all four indexes S&P 500, Nasdaq-100, Russell 2000 and Dow Jones Industrial Average making Micro E-mini futures the most successful product launch ever at CME Group.
E-Mini futures for the S&P 500 started firmer but were last down 0.1 percent.
S&P 500 Index e-mini futures were up 0.6 percent, suggesting the benchmark index was on track to open the week back near record territory.
E-Mini futures for the SandP 500 lost 0.3 percent and FTSE futures slid 0.8 percent.
shares, FTSE futures inched up 0.2 percent while S&P e-mini futures and Dow minis were also a touch firmer.
E-mini futures on the Standard & PoorA's 500 Index rose 0.3 percent after the underlying gauge lost just 0.4 percent on Monday.
S&P 500 E-mini futures expiring in June were little changed after the index gained 0.4 per cent last week.
S&P 500 E-mini futures volume was below the 1.52 million daily average of the past year on every day this week except Tuesday.
S&P E-mini futures dipped 0.3 percent in Asian trade on Wednesday after the Standard & Poor's 500 Index posted modest losses in the previous session.
A crucial part of the puzzle is a large sell trade of E-mini futures contracts by buy-side firm Waddell and Reed.