E-Government Act

E-Government Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 2002, that created a federal Chief Information Officer who is responsible for improving citizen access to government information by publishing and otherwise promoting it over the Internet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yap noted that he will likewise support the passage of significant measures, including the E-Government Act, which seeks to establish an effective E-Government plan that would create more valuable and meaningful services and strengthen the use of ICT within and across government agencies; and the Privacy of Communication Act that prohibits the interception and disclosure of oral, wire, or electronic communications and other violations of the right to privacy of communication.
According to the E-Government Act of 2002, PACER is only supposed to charge enough to cover its operating costs.
Courts with charging PACER users more than necessary to operate the system in violation of the E-Government Act of 2002 and maintained the excess should be returned to users.
The E-Government Act of 2002 created a division within the Office of Management and Budget whose primary responsibility is to create online frameworks that allow American citizens access to governmental information and services.
He also violated the E-Government Act," Siderov stated, as cited by LiveNews.
The E-Government Act of 2002 promotes more efficient uses of information technology by the federal government.
Compiled by the United States Government Accountability Office (no single author or editor is credited), this report reviews the Privacy Act of 1974 and the E-Government Act of 2002 to determine if there are consistencies between these laws and the federal government's policies toward personal information and privacy.
The CTO will have a specific focus on transparency, by ensuring that each arm of the federal government makes its records open and accessible as the E-Government Act requires.
With a focus on transparency, the CTO will ensure "that each arm of the federal government makes its records open and accessible as the E-Government Act requires."
In addition, the E-Government Act of 2002 requires federal agencies to conduct privacy impact assessments for systems or collections containing personal information.
"Unquestionably, the E-Government Act has changed the way that the public interacts with the government," Schwartz said.
The decrease in cost represents another step in the Judiciary's initiative to increase public access to court information that began with the E-Government Act of 2002, which set requirements for providing public access to government information over the Internet.