dysfunction

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dysfunction

any consequence of an activity which inhibits the achievement of the desired objective. In the study of ORGANIZATIONS, dysfunctions refer to those aspects of organizations which are essential to the organization's proper functioning but at the same time detract from organizational performance. For instance, a justifiable emphasis on following the correct procedures can also stifle the flexibility that is often needed in work situations. See GOAL DISPLACEMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
IF you have symptoms of erectile dysfunction, it might be a good idea to have your heart health checked.
GRISS is a 28-item, Likert-type, self-report scale that evaluates the presence and severity of sexual dysfunctions. Two separate forms are developed for men and women.
Forty-three percent of women in the endometriosis group had sexual dysfunction, compared with 18% in the control group (P less than .001), as measured by the Female Sexual Quotient.
Two gross categories of study participants were patients with thyroid dysfunctions and control, who had normal thyroid function.
(2005) showed that sterility treatment brought up sexual dysfunctions in 35% of couples (2).
Sexual Dysfunction: A Guide for Assessment and Treatment, 3rd Edition
Clinical manifestations of diastolic dysfunction may vary from relative to asymptomatic state to a patient with overt heart failure.
SCI and MS each have different attributes, but they also share some similar traits including impaired mobility, urinary bladder dysfunction and bowel dysfunction.
An extract of Lepidium peruvianum, a high-altitude root plant popularly known as maca, has been shown to regulate several key physiological pathways of female sexual dysfunction. Maca is believed to work primarily by providing the optimum balance of nutrients utilized by the body's neuroendocrine system.
Otherwise known as erectile dysfunction, it requires interference with the co-ordination of one or more of vascular, neurologic, hormonal and psychological factors (Brock 2002), with vascular being responsible in about 70% of cases.
To the best of our knowledge, there is no study using multivariable analysis to determine the predictors of antidepressant-emergent sexual dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate early evolution, tolerability, and predictors of antidepressant-emergent sexual dysfunction in patients with anxiety or depressive disorder.
Conclusion: Birth asphyxia was associated with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension which demands precise evaluation, early recognition and appropriate management.