Dual banking

Dual banking

Describes United States custom in which a bank is chartered by the state or federal government.

Dual Banking

In the United States, the regulatory situation in which a bank may receive a charter from either the Federal Reserve or the state in which it operates. This is a function of federalism in the United States, and is different from banking regulation in many other countries. See also: Member bank, Non-member bank.
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Even if that were possible to do, he said that with the dual banking system, the problem would "exacerbate tenfold" if state regulators were added to the mix.
Cetin's presentation provided insight on the application of CDMs for analysis of efficiency and other aspects of financial stability in a country and for comparison between Islamic and conventional banks in countries that have dual banking systems.
Though Sudan is one of the only completely Shari'ah-compliant banking systems in the word, a growing number of African countries have dual banking systems with distinct regulatory frameworks for Islamic banking.
George (2012) discusses the benefits of the dual banking system and argues that multiple options have led to considerable innovation and improvement in banking services.
With his considerable banking experience and strong commitment to community banking and the dual banking system, Tom Marantz will be a great addition to the State Banking Board, said Robert J.
States' dual banking system comprises both federal-and
Dual banking system was introduced in Indonesia in 1992 since the establishment of Bank Muamalat.
Pakistan and many Muslim countries are experiencing dual banking system.
We talk about a dual banking system that's supposed to be practiced in Indonesia; just one single gesture by the Central Bank, that every conventional bank should offer dual products, would solve one big problem.
The issue now, said Blaine, is to examine how the NCUA is bent on injuring the dual banking system through its practices.
The letter voiced concern that a dual or "optional" [federal] charter would likely repeat the failure of our dual banking system, "where regulators competed through deregulation.
The first country which enjoyed a dual banking system is the United Arab Emirates where the Dubai Islamic Bank was established in 1973 with a paid-up capital of US$14 million.