Dual Exchange Rate

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Dual Exchange Rate

A situation in which a currency has two official exchange rates, one pegged to another currency and the other floating. Each is used for different things. The exchange rate for money used for sectors seen as essential, such as food, is fixed, while "non-essential" sectors are allowed to float. A dual exchange rate allows a country to devalue its currency to reflect market realities without the pain of high inflation that usually accompanies severe devaluation. Critics allege that a dual exchange rate is less efficient than a straightforward devaluation and acts as a tariff on industries the government sees as luxuries.
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Whilst it is important to note that unifi- cation of Iran's dual exchange rates would pose a risk to Arak's earnings in the near-term, we do not envisage this happening in 2017.
The latter change creates excess demand for foreign bonds which, because of the presence of dual exchange rates, depreciates the financial exchange rate and reduces the current domestic real interest rate.
This occurs because dual exchange rates enable free-spending politicians to enjoy the same temporarily low inflation as fixed regimes, as well as a temporary consumption boom which is regarded as desirable by impatient politicians.
In 1958, more new laws were enacted to transform multiple exchange rates into dual exchange rates, to devalue the overvalued purchase price of the Taiwanese currency, and to emphasize the encouragement of exports rather than the restriction of imports.
Myanmar is one of only 17 countries that still have dual exchange rates and even the IMF has only three experts on how to unify them.
It is difficult to see how Europe might adopt dual exchange rates, one for trade and another for capital movements, in a way that would not provide opportunities for financial arbitrage.
After unifying the dual exchange rates of the Chinese currency renminbi (RMB) and implementing a managed-float system on January 1, 1994, China formally committed itself to partial currency convertibility, that is, currency convertibility under the current account, in December 1996.
The new package of economic measures announced by the government recently to conserve the dwindling foreign exchange reserves, curb flight of capital, restore the credibility of economic management and addressing the effects of international economic sanctions imposed on Pakistan in the wake of the nuclear tests, ushers in dual exchange rates, is a virtual devaluation and an attempt to compress imports by making them costlier.
New concerns about the durability of the Smithsonian Agreement surfaced in early 1973, after the Swiss authorities permitted their currencies to float and Italian authorities adopted dual exchange rates. (The United Kingdom had already allowed sterling to float, in June 1972.) In this context, a tightening of monetary policies abroad, the partial relaxation of the U.S.
In the Dominican Republic plan, dual exchange rates were in place for a year before being unified into a single floating rate.

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