drywall

(redirected from Drywaller)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

drywall

Also called wallboard or gypsum board,it is a panel of gypsum covered on both sides with paper and used as the primary wall material in home construction. Commonly also called by a particular brand name, Sheetrock.

References in periodicals archive ?
Don't look for much sympathy from union drywallers, who know that their bosses have to pay those very same premiums.
As for remodeler complaints that drywallers are sloppy, clean up in neighbor's yards, and have no idea that GCs are in the service business, Redden admits, "They're probably right.
"Maybe the drywaller can do 10 homes a week, but the painter can only do seven," says George Casey.
In the past, he said, the association also had provided legal services against deportation and criminal-detention cases, "which had given it credibility with the militant immigrant drywaller leadership."
He served in the Army National Guard and worked as a drywaller for Ehlers Construction in Eugene.
Father Salandini has invited his friend Cesar Chavez, the United Farm Workers' leader who has already given the drywaller strikers his encouragement.
He worked as a roofer for many years and most recently was a drywaller for Hathaway's Inc.
Thanks largely to a slow market, the drywaller is charging the same as before.
"We use them as a tool to get our regular subs to drop their prices." (In 1992, falling wages also sparked a violent drywaller strike that has since petered out.)
Also coming by the thousands upon thousands are painters, roofers, landscapers, drywallers, construction workers, care takers; you know, all the hands on work that used to provide the middle class with a decent standard of living.
For instance, we see that Sacramento area builders cannot effectively compete with San Francisco Bay Area builders for drywallers due to dramatic pricing differences - Bay Area drywall contractors pay much higher piece labor rates than drywall contractors in Sacramento.
The various state-level realtor organizations collect hundreds of millions of dollars a year as well, not to mention the trade associations for the homebuilders, mortgage bankers, roofers, drywallers, plumbers, tile installers, title insurers, and the like.