DES

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DES

Abbreviation for "Delivered Ex Ship."
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Delivered Ex Ship

In international commerce, an agreement between a buyer and a seller in which the seller must bear all costs and risks of transporting a good until it has arrived at a port and has been made available for the buyer or his/her agent to retrieve it. That is, the seller has total responsibility while the good is being shipped overseas. The seller must pay the shipping company and purchase insurance for the good. See also: Incoterm.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in safety profile between second generation drug-eluting stents. Subgroup analysis at 2 years from the ESTROFA-2 Spanish registry.
Elevated levels of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol independently associated with in-stent restenosis in diabetic patients after drug-eluting stent implantation.
Lee et al., "Incidence and predictors of drug-eluting stent fractures in long coronary disease," International Journal of Cardiology, vol.
Though drug-eluting stents are becoming much more commonly implanted than bare-metal types, a BMS may be a more appealing option if the patient has a very high risk of bleeding or if a physician believes the patient won't be able to adhere to DAPT over a period of months or years.
ADAPT-DES is the largest study ever to explore the overall treatment implications of platelet reactivity on patient outcomes after successful coronary drug-eluting stent implantation.
There is controversy over whether the drug-eluting stent or the bare metal stent has superior clinical benefit.
According to the Natick, Mass.-based cardiovascular device giant, the devices are the only drug-eluting stent (DES) systems in the United States with an approved indication to treat patients with AMI.
A drug-eluting stent is a peripheral or coronary stent (a scaffold) placed into narrowed, diseased peripheral or coronary arteries that slowly releases a drug to block cell proliferation.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the Xience V drug-eluting stent, with the requirement that the manufacturer conduct postmarketing studies, including one that follows rates of stent thrombosis and other events in recipients for 5 years.
Key Words: drug-eluting stent, complications, perioperative complications, myocardial infarction, perioperative clopidogrel