draw

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draw

(1) A request that a lender advance funds under a construction or other future-advances loan.

(2) A periodic request by a contractor or subcontractor for a portion of the contract price for a job, usually according to the percentage of completion of the work and the cost of materials and labor.

References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing blood samples from a syringe causes shearing forces and turbulence that has the capability to destroy the red blood cell membrane making hemolysis more prevalent and unavoidable.
People who suffer from very high level of diabetes may have to test their blood sugar level by drawing blood more than eight times a day.
Michelangelo Drawing Blood will be at Birmingham mac on May 9.
Scholes saw red after drawing blood in a thigh-high lunge, then all hell broke loose when Balotelli goaded the United fans and winked as he was pulled away by team-mates.
Angry Lloyd punched the board when the German fought back to level at 2-2, drawing blood and stunning the referee and the crowd.
Carriers adopts a lowkey approach to its subject matter, drawing blood from the same vein as 28 Days Later - although here, the infected thankfully don't feast on human flesh.
The raids unravelled an intricate network of blood adulterators who had everything set up down to the last detail, including syringes, saline bottles, wrappers of registered hospitals and blood banks, stickers of blood groups, and other instruments used in drawing blood from donors.
He let go when he realised she was pregnant, and Ionita, having thrown the perfume to the floor, jumped in front of him and dug her nails into his hand, drawing blood, as her accomplice ran away.
"The board recognized the present economic landscape, and to ask for more money out of our students would be like drawing blood from a turnip," board President Colleen Clark said.
except for a necklace drawing blood against my thigh.
A technology for cancer detection that eliminates the need for drawing blood has been developed by researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.
A nurse testing a patient by drawing blood once or twice per hour consumes some two hours of nursing time per day, placing a strain on staffing and affecting health-care costs.