Downturn


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Downturn

(1) A period of contraction or decline of economic activity, especially real GDP, but typically employment as well. (2) The transition of an economy from growth to contraction, also known as a peak of economic activity.

Downturn

A decline in a security or market, especially after a long bullish period. A downturn is considered an inevitable part of the business cycle. See also: Bear market.

downturn

A decline in security prices or economic activity following a period of rising or stable prices or activity. Even strong bull markets are subject to occasional downturns.
References in periodicals archive ?
Head of UK Wealth, HSBC, Caroline Connellan, commented "Our research shows that the financial hangover from the economic downturn is impacting what many are saving for retirement.
Despite the old adage often mouthed by executives in all industries, "Invest in a downturn," very few put their money where their mouths are.
com, the financial services online market place, told said: "In the last downturn I learned how to negotiate contract and to understand the market better as well as developing good people skills.
Every point below 100 percent of order fill rate represents lost revenue opportunity, and in an economic downturn, lost revenue resulting from less than a 100 percent fill rate while having large inventories is just bad business.
I just returned from a trip visiting several casting facilities, during which the focus of discussion was how to handle an economic downturn.
uk is designed to help anyone affected by the downturn find the help and advice they need as easily and quickly as possible.
While some doomsday reports have coined the downturn a pseudo Great Depression, Peter Linneman, chief economist at the international real estate network NAI Global, prefers to call today's environment the "Great Capital Strike.
While the pace and size of the decline are very similar in all of these cases, the most recent downturn sticks out in terms of how long it has lasted.
With the downturn in the credit cycle on the horizon, large distressed-debt funds continue to be raised by an array of market participants.
An August study by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York suggests that the level of structural job losses during this most recent downturn and recovery could make job creation more difficult.
Since 2000, and in parallel with the rise in the mid-1990s, revenues have fallen below the levels that might have been expected from the cyclical downturn, particularly in the United States, and some European Union (EU) member countries, such as the United Kingdom.
As Crone examines the cyclical component of economic activity, it also appears that Pennsylvania's cyclical downturns have been more severe than those of the Nation as a whole.