Downside

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Downside

In technical analysis and fundamental analysis, an estimate of the potential percentage or dollar amount by which a security may fall in the near-term. There are various methodologies used to determine an upside. For example, an analyst may look at recent trends on a bank stock and believe that it has the potential to fall in value by 15% in the next few weeks. This might be an indication for investors to sell the stock. Downside is also known as downside risk. See also: Upside Potential.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another downside risk is the ongoing corporate restructuring.
Downside risks are a prolonged period of low oil prices, regional geopolitical threats, loss of competitiveness due to stronger $, material domestic liquidity tightening, real estate collapse, increased borrowing for projects with low return and global risk aversion, which may cut market access to Dubai Inc.
Shirai also said the main downside risks are possible downward adjustments related to overseas economies, such as Europe's sovereign debt crisis, slowing Chinese growth and the looming US fiscal cliff.
Global growth remains modest and downside risks are still elevated," the finance ministers and central bank governors of the Group of 20 advanced and major developing countries said in a joint statement released after their two-day meeting in Mexico City.
The retailer's risk aversion is modeled by the Value-at-Risk (VaR) approach with the downside risk constraint.
High unemployment rates as well as downside risks for the housing markets in several advanced economies also could dampen consumer confidence and result in weakening the global growth outlook, Lipsky added.
Going forward, there are some risks, especially downside risks remaining,'' Kazuo Ueda, a member of the Policy Board at the Bank of Japan (BOJ), said at a central banking conference in Singapore.
Biotech stocks, of course, promise enormous profits, but carry huge downside risks.
Summary: Turkish cement producers are facing a balanced picture of upside and downside risks.
The credit outlook for most euro area countries is stable, balancing the moderate economic recovery under way, which is supported by lower commodity prices and the impact of quantitative easing by the European Central Bank (ECB), with a range of downside risks, Moody's Investors Service says in a new report today.
Governor Stephen Poloz said that the central bank was concerned about low inflation, even though upside and downside risks are balanced.