Dow Jones Averages


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Dow Jones Averages

Measures of changes in the market value of blue chip stocks traded on the New York Stock Exchange (and occasionally NASDAQ), weighted by price. Price-weighting means that stocks with higher prices per share affect the averages more. There are four Dow Jones Averages: the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), the Dow Jones Transportation Average (DJTA), the Dow Jones Utility Average (DJUA), and the Dow Jones Composity Average (DJCA). The DJIA tracks 30 major companies in different industries, such as General Electric and Bank of America. The DJTA tracks 20 transportation companies, including railroads and airlines. The DJUA tracks 15 utility companies, most of which are defensive securities. The DJCA tracks all 65 companies in the other averages. See also: Publicly-traded company.
References in periodicals archive ?
For each interval the table lists the number of positive impulses which occurred in that interval for each of the three Dow Jones Averages.
Table 2 shows correlation coefficient values calculated for each interval, for each of the three Dow Jones Averages, for lags 40 to 100, and for lags 40 to 200.
[P.sub.t] = closing value of Dow Jones Average on trading day t
Deletions from Dow Jones Averages 1962-1991 CAR(-1,0) Day(0) Difference in n (Z-score) Relative Volume T-statistic DJIA 6 -1.072 0.618 (-1.025) DJTA 10 0.600 0.413 (0.193) 9.
Unlike the S&P 500, for which the Stock Price Notification Service is available, no information prior to the news release announcing the roster change in the Dow Jones Average is available to the general public.
On Wall Street, economists and traders know it's much easier to predict tomorrow's Dow Jones averages than those for the following week.
This material is drawn from several Dow Jones New/Retrieval databases, including Tradeline, Historical Quotes, Historical Dow Jones Averages, and Futures Quotes.