Doublethink


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Doublethink

A political term referring to the act of willingly believing two contradictory statements. For example, doublethink may involve trusting the government when one's preferred party is in power and never trusting it when the preferred party is not in power. The term is strongly associated with government propaganda. See also: Doublespeak.
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I believe that the doublethink which permeates contemporary educational reform is best captured by the conflicting--if not mutually incompatible--ideologies behind the Common Core State Standards and Race to the Top.
The Zionist doublethink wanted viewers to believe that Israeli residents were under constant threat, yet the country remained safe for tourists.
for "Big Brother") is "an act of self-hypnosis, a deliberate drowning of consciousness" (18-19); and when practicing doublethink a person is said "consciously to induce unconsciousness, and then, once again become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you have just performed" (38).
While the essay in Adams's volume, written by a former linguistics professor, gets caught up in the mechanics of word formation, Hitchings limns the broader resonances of Orwell's doublethink, first describing and then debunking the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (crudely stated, the notion that our language determines our reality).
That's the war that made our world," he explained to Doublethink in 2006.
31) proves especially crucial in articulating the doublethink that while money might underwrite life's good things, such as love, art and kindness to others, the pursuit of money for its own sake is still a bad thing.
118: "The only thing I detest as much as theological doublethink is psychobabble.
The buzzword in that briefing was "strict", which seemed to appear in every paragraph, but in a bizarre piece of doublethink the best betting approach may be to anticipate strict refereeing and back a low number of yellow cards.
But sexual acts coexisted with the path of meditation and asceticism--some interpreted the acts as intended to occur only on a symbolic level--and so a kind of religious doublethink arose that fostered tolerance.
Orwell did, however, coin Newspeak, Oldspeak and duck-speak (speaking from the throat without thinking 'like a duck') and doublethink (holding ".
The doublethink at the heart of current UK government's policy is perhaps best illustrated by the suggestion made by one coalition minister to her London constituents that they borrow all the books from the public library to prevent the council - now starved of central government funds and unable to support it - from shutting it down.
Such Orwellian doublethink is disingenuous at best and dishonest at worse.