Doublethink

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Doublethink

A political term referring to the act of willingly believing two contradictory statements. For example, doublethink may involve trusting the government when one's preferred party is in power and never trusting it when the preferred party is not in power. The term is strongly associated with government propaganda. See also: Doublespeak.
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We root for him so hard because he came up the same way we did and can speak to and for us, and we double-think the fact that he's become the Boss living in a Hollywood Hills mansion, whose music and career outline a fin de siecle summary of rock's history, a narrative reworking of its genetic strands into one final, do-not-go-gentle scream.
On the contrary, many discussions about this aspect of the concept of God still leave more than a suspicion of double-think.
He reopens Bukharin's trial, seeing in the Bolshevik's testimony complete intellectual captivity to the mystique of the Communist Party, a deeply ingrained double-think that was the product of Leninism, not Stalinism.
Annas indeed tries to mitigate the effects of the consequential double-think, which notoriously plagues modem utilitarian attempts to accommodate traditional virtues of character, by denying that Aristotle's version of the two-level account is such as to import the "schizophrenia" problem.
Was this double-think in the name of journalism inspired by the company's executives or its attack-dog labor law firm, King and Ballow?
Denial of unpleasant facts helps explain recurring instances of double standards, or indeed double-think, like de Gaulle's view of the United States as the main threat to France's independence (while knowing full well that Soviet troops were, as he put it in 1947, 'two legs of the Tour de France away from Strasbourg'), or the Europeans' strong objection to linking continued aid with Soviet good behaviour as originally agreed in Helsinki.
Des Pres writes that for many of us "truth has become an unword, a term seldom seen in our professionally authorized publications; but a word nonetheless that in the world of double-think and the memory hole still retains its archaic authority" (226).
That is typical of trendy, liberal theologians and clerics: their stance on abortion can make no sense, except perhaps to the practitioners of Orwellian double-think who have mastered the art of holding two contradictory ideas in the mind and simultaneously believing both to be true.
It is anchored by a quite superb central character in Tucker, played magnificently by Capaldi, who is a master of potty-mouthed fury and double-think, repairing smashed reputations with diabolic sleight of mind.
It is a strange double-think, in which science-based and evidence-based progress is refused on ideological grounds, while potentially dangerous and often untried and useless remedies are accepted without question.
I wonder who is next in line for this bit of double-think - perhaps the poor burglars.
However, I see it as part of a pattern of New Labour double-think.