New Economy

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New Economy

An informal term for the changes that came to developed economies during the late 1990s. The new economy came about largely as a result of the popularization of the Internet. For example, because of the new economy, online companies can provide information for free and derive their revenue from advertising. Likewise, many jobs can now be done anywhere. That is, many jobs no longer require one to be present in the office; for example, one can do work in Oklahoma for a company based in Pennsylvania. See also: Dot-com bubble.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The end of February 2000 also marked the end of the dot-com bubble.
Oracle, shareholders claimed that Oracle misled them when it blamed a missed profit forecast in 2001 on the dot-com bubble burst.
The dot-com bubble was characterized by amazing, even "irrationally exuberant" growth in the price of technology stocks during the period of 1995-2000.
Since many of today's managers haven't lived through challenging times in their career, Nicholas Read, author of Selling to the C-Suite (Mc-Graw Hill, 2010), offers tips from former executives at companies who successfully survived the 1970s stock-market crash and 1990s dot-com bubble for achieving sustainable growth, even through the recession:
Massenet, awarded an MBE last year, launched the firm with a modest loan in 2000 as the dot-com bubble burst.
NSC officials indicated that the overall shrinkage in the three science parks' annual revenue in 2009, which hadn't been seen since the dot-com bubble burst in 2001, was mainly caused by the global financial tsunami that broke out in September of 2008, which severely impacted Taiwanese enterprises across all industries, especially high-tech companies, who contribute the largest proportion to science parks' annual revenues.
Through the Russian debt crisis of 1998 and the dot-com bubble burst of 2000 to the fall of Lehman Brothers and the entire market in 2008, much can be blamed on the foolish risk taking within the derivatives and bond market and political motives that lacked foresight.
With lessons learned from historical trends including the dot-com bubble, he discusses the strategies of creating new forms of value, adding value, reducing costs, and developing markets.
Benefits of SAYE option schemes include employee motivation, aligning employees' interests with those of shareholders, recruiting and retain key employees, and reducing staff turnover Mr Winston added: "The stock market crash caused by the dot-com bubble burst in 2001 was a serious set back for the SAYE campaign.
Tulip-bulb valuations did not rise again to stratospheric heights after the Tulip Craze went bust, nor did the NASDAQ dot-com bubble re-inflate, for the very good reason that bubbles are never based on rational valuations.
He managed to dodge the dot-com bubble burst by a hair, pursuing commercial construction instead.
Messier went on an acquisitions tear in the bull market of the late '90s, bulwarked by Vivendi's seemingly ever-soaring stock price, which rose during the dot-com bubble. The purchase of Seagram alone--which brought Universal Studios, MCA Records and USA Networks into the fold--cost Vivendi $42 billion in 1999.