dot-com

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Dot-Com

A business, especially a publicly-traded company, that conducts most or all of its business over the Internet. Dot-coms may conduct business in one or more of the following areas: Content, Commerce, and Connection. Content companies provide information, either for free or for a charge, and earn most of their operating income from advertising. Commerce companies sell new and/or used goods directly over the Internet. Connection companies provide Internet services directly to customers.

Dot-coms were hugely popular investments in the 1990s, with IPOs of hundreds of dollars per share, even if a company had never produced a profit and, in some cases, had never earned any revenue. This came from the theory that Internet companies needed to expand their customer bases as much as possible and thus corner the largest possible market share, even if this meant massive losses. While this worked for some dot-coms, notably Google, which did not produce a profit for its first several years of operation, the theory was unsustainable because, in a given industry, only one or two companies could corner large market shares, meaning most dot-coms were doomed to failure. This dot-com bubble burst in 2000.

dot-com

1. Of or relating to a company or the stock of a company engaged primarily in a business associated with the Internet. Amazon.com is the most obvious example of a dot-com company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, in many cases, having brick-and-mortar locations will help dot com companies differentiate themselves.
Hindman says after the session, a few representatives from dot com companies approached her and said because they compete against each other every day, they wanted her to lead the group to create the uniform information.
If yesterday's see-saw events confirmed one thing, it is that investors' hysterical love affair with so-called dot com companies is well and truly over.
Sun has been quick to promote its dominance among the top ISP and dot com companies. We wonder whether a similar ranking of the leading e-business sites and their equipment suppliers would help focus IBM's e-business strategy.