Donor

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Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
NHSBT is also launching a special service for donors with this blood group to help retain and recruit donors, because of how critical their types have become to patient care.
Nationally, the number of male donors has also been dropping worryingly quickly.
Researchers reviewed 294 living donor medical records, including 31 marijuana using donors.
* Until today, 450 donors of the Karaiskakio Foundation's archive have provided a transplant to patients from 33 different countries.
The list goes on and is made up of a range of failures on both the donor and recipient ends of the supply chain.
while reliance is thus largely on family replacement donors.
For women who need donor eggs to conceive, enhanced search features of prescreened, ready-to-donate donors and a new reservation system make finding a donor a simpler process.
You can drive up your average gift by limiting the donors you acquire by sending appeals just to higher-value prospects.
In an effort to ensure adequate, sustainable and safe blood supply, it is crucial not only to increase the number of donations, but also to target donors meeting standard eligibility criteria and avoid those with risk, identified through the health questionnaire, who should be deferred either temporarily or permanently.1 Donor eligibility policies are a critical layer of blood safety designed to protect donors as well as recipients.2,3 The risk of transfusion safety threats varies by donation history (first-time vs.
All this, thanks to the generosity of one non-directed donor and numerous other donors selflessly giving to strangers to enable their own friend, sibling, mother, father, coworker, child, or church member to receive a kidney.
One solution to this shortage is the use of living donors for liver transplantation.