Slavery

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Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It's not like Disney, where all animals are forced into domestic slavery
resravek system of domestic slavery in Haiti and the Dominican Republic," said
Finally, the presence of Portuguese "New Christians" in England at the turn of the seventeenth century, formerly Jewish families fleeing the persecutions of the Inquisition, perpetuated Iberian norms of domestic slavery to which Englishmen had been introduced at the turn of the sixteenth century (91-95).
In 2005, Nathan, then the manager of a Port-au-Prince orphanage, told me his remarkable story of child domestic slavery and escape for my book, "A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face With Modern-Day Slavery." He also served as a guide, walking me through some of the Haitian capital's toughest neighborhoods, including the gang-controlled community, Cite Soleil.
Sex trafficking and domestic slavery are also killing women and girls at a frightening rate.
Section two is composed of narratives from females who experienced domestic slavery and sex slavery in various parts of the world.
While the large majority of these children are those currently living on the street, many are children locally known as "restaveks" - young boys and girls sold into domestic slavery by desperately poor families in need of cash.
Consequently, issues of domestic slavery, colonial policies of indirect rule and the nature and meaning of nationalism have been either ignored or given little attention.
Domestic slavery in Africa, having existed long before its Atlantic counterpart, is also discussed in the book.
In this, he makes very effective use of an 1817 book, A Portrait of Domestic Slavery, by abolitionist Jesse Torrey.
Essays reveal the connection between the people of the region as well as their interaction with the Europeans, and challenge the idea that domestic slavery increased as a result of international trade.