Husband and Wife

(redirected from Domestic abuse)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Domestic abuse: Emotional abuse

Husband and Wife

A status that, among other things, entitles a couple to file a joint income tax return. For the purpose of joint returns, common-law marriages are recognized only if the state in which the two persons reside recognizes such marriages or if the state in which the marriage began recognizes common-law marriages. The status as husband and wife on the last day of the tax year governs the right to file a joint return.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, even before a victim of domestic abuse verbally discloses domestic abuse, some professionals - police, nurse and doctor - are already aware of the crime being committed.
"It will ensure that staff, especially frontline staff, are trained and understand domestic abuse, its dynamics and the risks to women, children and young people.
According to statistics, domestic abuse is the biggest cause of women's homelessness in Scotland, with 78 per cent of homelessness applications from women in 2017-18 giving the reason as 'a dispute within the household (violent or abusive)' - and more than half had children on their application.
Marsha Scott, chief executive of Scottish Women's Aid, will speak about the new legislation and Luke Hart of CoCo Awareness will talk about his own experiences of domestic abuse.
Justice secretary Humza Yousaf said: "The Domestic Abuse Act makes absolutely clear coercive and controlling behaviour is domestic abuse and a crime.
Council's public safety convener Councillor Maureen Bennison said: "It is shocking that around one in five women in Scotland will experience some form of domestic abuse at some time in their life.
"We urgently need to change the law so that all survivors made homeless due to domestic abuse get the immediate help they need to find a safe home in which to recover and rebuild their lives."
These new services include: community-based support for victims; a counselling service for children affected by domestic abuse; supported accommodation for victims fleeingabuse;and a perpetrator service.
"More importantly however, it is about putting that statement into action, through embedding a supportive culture that serves to identify and respond to instances of domestic abuse, and undertaking some very practical measures around awareness, training, advice and partnerships with specialist services.
Women and girls are more than twice as likely as men and boys to experience domestic abuse, and nationally are much more likely to be killed in a domestic homicide.
Detective Superintendent Gordon McCreadie, national lead for domestic abuse, said the conviction was a "positive start" towards tackling domestic abuse.