Doctrine of sovereign immunity


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Related to Doctrine of sovereign immunity: Act of State Doctrine

Doctrine of sovereign immunity

Principle that a nation may not be tried in another country without its consent.

Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity

A legal principle that a nation may not be tried in another nation's courts without its own consent. This is important when a foreign corporation has a legal claim against another nation's government. It must go to that nation's courts in order to seek redress.
References in periodicals archive ?
story, which ends with the doctrine of sovereign immunity precluding his
I believe that someday the Supreme Court will change course and abolish the doctrine of sovereign immunity from American law.
succinct description states the doctrine of sovereign immunity strips
if the doctrine of sovereign immunity were to not apply to an SWF's
The doctrine of sovereign immunity precludes the state court--and the federal court which gained limited jurisdiction upon removal--from exercising jurisdiction to compel Downie to testify contrary to EPA instructions, and also denies it the authority to review and set aside the EPA's decision and the federal regulations under which it is made.
(54) The doctrine of sovereign immunity allows Congress to prioritize important public concerns and government administration without bowing to the claims of private actors, and FISA's civil-liability provision was drafted with that purpose in mind.
(15.) See infra Part II.G (examining government suit, oil Pollution Act, and doctrine of sovereign immunity).
However, one might argue that a prudent attorney would not bring a suit against a state for such violations due to the doctrine of sovereign immunity. A similar issue was identified by Mr.
The first two questions have affirmative answers, due to the general acceptance both of the rules of state succession and of limits on the doctrine of sovereign immunity. This means that a loan contracted by one regime creates legally enforceable rights that, depending on the sovereign's foreign asset holdings and reliance on foreign-source revenues, can result in meaningful recourse for creditors.
The long standing judicial doctrine of sovereign immunity, which prevents citizens from suing the government unless the government gives its consent to such suits, is an antiquated carryover from the days of the near-absolute power of the English kings (1) and is based on the philosophy that the sovereign cannot commit a legal wrong and, thus, should be immune from civil suit.
(87) First, Northern asserted there was a single doctrine of sovereign immunity arising from the Eleventh Amendment of the Constitution.
Any State, any instrumentality of a State, and any officer or employee of a State or instrumentality of a State acting in his official capacity, shall not be immune, under the eleventh amendment of the Constitution of the United States or under any other doctrine of sovereign immunity, from suit in Federal court by any person, including any governmental or nongovernmental entity, for infringement of a patent under section 271, or for any other violation under this title.
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