Diuturnum Illud

Diuturnum Illud

An encyclical letter written by Pope Leo XIII in 1881 in response to increased civil unrest in Europe by anarchists and communists. It states that Christians owe obedience to the state and recommends that they work within the state for positive social change. It also criticizes social contract theory.
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The meaning of Rerum Novarum emerges within a comprehensive vision developed by Leo XIII in several previous encyclicals: Diuturnum illud (June 29, 1881) explained the foundations of political authority; Immortale Dei (November 1, 1885) sought an organic cooperation between the Church and political society; and Libertas (June 20, 1888) reminded readers of the constitutive link of human liberty with truth.
Asi aparece magnificamente sintetizado en un pasaje de la enciclica Diuturnum Illud de Leon XIII y que considero altamente significativo del modo eclesiastico de entender todos los acontecimientos entre los siglos XVI y XX: <<Las teorias sobre la autoridad politica inventadas por ciertos autores modernos, han acarreado ya a la humanidad serios disgustos, y es muy de temer que, andando el tiempo, nos traeran mayores males.
Leo XIII, Diuturnum illud, On Civil Government, June 29, 1881, tr.
D'altra parte, Leone XIII -il che fu un autentico rinnovamento- annuncia le sue aperture nei confronti della democrazia e della neutralita della Chiesa rispetto alle diverse forme statuali nell'enciclica Diuturnum illud (1881).
Subsequently, he forged a political doctrine with a series of encyclicals: Diuturnum illud (1881) on the divine origin of power, Immortale Dei (1885) on the Christian constitution of Nation-states, and Libertas praestantissimum (1888) on the Christian conception of human freedom.
See Benedict XVI, Caritas in Veritate, 53; Leo XIII, encyclical letter Diuturnum Illud (June 29, 1881); Pius VI, encyclical letter Quod Aliquantum (March 10, 1791).