Discouraged Worker


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Discouraged Worker

A person in the labor force who is not actively looking for work or who has been unable to find a job for an extended period of time. Discouraged workers are considered "marginally attached" to the labor force. Somewhat controversially, discouraged workers are generally not included in official estimations of unemployment.
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That figure includes not only the "official" unemployed--people just laid off or otherwise out of work but actively looking for employment--but also workers who would prefer to have full-time jobs but who have accepted part-time work; workers who are only marginally attached to the economy; and--perhaps the hardest to reach and measure, "non" labor force--the discouraged worker.
Ibon said the number of underemployed and discouraged worker are also rapidly rising, noting that underemployed Filipinos increased by 847,000 to 7.7 million in January 2016 from the same period last year.
While these shifts are ongoing, Bosworth says "the surprise lies with the growing magnitude of the perceived discouraged worker component." Who is staying out?
This decline illustrates what economists call the "discouraged worker effect," and helps explain the dip in the local unemployment rate in the third quarter of 2009.
This group might be considered a kind of 'partly discouraged worker,' analogous to the usual category we might call 'fully discouraged.' Adding this group together with the involuntary part-timers yields a total of about 3.5 per cent of all Romanian employment in 2001, an economically significant size.
These are the discouraged worker phenomenon, the use of inventories
This result is referred to as the discouraged worker effect.
"It's something that economists refer to as the discouraged worker factor," Delay said.
A part of that increased growth should come from the discouraged worker group -- those who were not looking for a job because they believed no job was available.
Compared to the number of persons officially classified as unemployed--8.0 million in 1994--the so-called "hidden unemployed," at least as measured through the new discouraged worker concept, were a relatively small group.
The most substantive definitional change concerned persons classified as discouraged workers. Considerable tightening of the requirements for discouraged worker status reduced the number of persons so classified by about half.