contingency plan

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Related to Disaster recovery: Disaster Recovery Plan

contingency plan

tactics which would be adopted in the event of a firm's original plans being thwarted. It is important for a BUSINESS to establish contingency plans so that they have a fall-back position. If, for example, a key component supplier is unable to deliver on time, the firm should have alternative suppliers lined up to avoid excessive disruption to its own production process.
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Hayden Sadler, Emirates Computers' Solutions Consultant says, "Making provisions for fast and reliable disaster recovery is a key factor for any business.
Common disaster recovery solutions today tend to provide for the always available, full disaster recovery scenario.
Disaster Recovery Guides, Mobilization Kit and Other Resources
In today's information-centric environment, much of a disaster recovery plan addresses IT systems and data loss.
a tutorial on areas that are frequently overlooked when preparing disaster recovery plans
Now many firms are making disaster recovery arrangements to insure the same level of protection that our tenants experienced immediately following the disaster.
Through this partnership, solution providers now have the option to offer their customers ShadowProtect disk-based backup and disaster recovery software as a service.
A more complete solution that accounts for both a greater number of data loss scenarios and offers the ability to recover a system to a more current date-time stamp would include the installation of personal disaster recovery software.
If your CPA firm hasn't walked through a simulated scenario to "stress test" a disaster recovery plan, you won't uncover its weaknesses until you're in the midst of a crisis, says Philip Jan Rothstein, president of Rothstein Associates Inc.
With disaster recovery processes at or near the top of IT priorities, most enterprises now maintain redundant data centers to improve the continuity and survivability of their business in the case of critical IT failures or external disasters.
The latest edition of the Disaster Recovery Yellow Pages by Steven Lewis may well provide the answer.

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