Direct quote


Also found in: Acronyms.

Direct quote

For foreign exchange, the number of US dollars needed to buy one unit of a foreign currency.

Direct Terms

In foreign exchange, the expression of a currency in terms of one unit of a different currency. For example, to say there are two U.S. dollars per one British pound is to express the dollar in direct terms to the pound. See also: Indirect terms, Currency pair.
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Nothing dulls American newspapers like the daily stream of boring quotes that do none of the things direct quotes do well.
In other words, a good direct quote does some work, but sometimes direct quotes merely move information.
But at the same time, we never used the Israeli descriptions of saboteurs or terrorists, unless, also, it was a direct quote from and Israeli source.
Notes: questions regarding the crm direct quote are due to jayne mccleland at jmccleland@hoosierlottery nolater than monday, november 21, 2016 at 12 noon est.
Each entry includes author/institution of origin, item number, date, location, number of pages, series/reel number, frame number, and a descriptive annotation usually with a direct quote for context.
Many Bible-believing Christians will point out to Dr Hall that the scriptures teach that God is the author of evil and love to quote the following chilling passage, which they take to be a direct quote from God: "I make peace, and create evil" (Isaiah 45:7).
The response you receive will be a direct quote from the presidential candidate.
Schweiger chose a different quote and indicated that her selection was a direct quote from a student.
Whatever the length of the direct quote, be sure that you have copied words and punctuation exactly and noted the page number(s).
Ryan said that Morrow only rejoined the commentary as he finished describing the humorous movie scene, adding that the word used to describe the character was a direct quote from the film and there was no offence intended, so he will not be apologizing as it would be insincere.
A direct quote from the article, therefore they haven't done anything wrong.
In the Fall 2013 Baseball Research Journal, Norman Macht and Robert Warrington's article "The Veracity of Veeck" attributed a direct quote to researcher and writer Paul Dickson without citation.