Dinosaur


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Dinosaur

1. An employee with a great deal of experience. The term is somewhat of a backhanded compliment as it connotes a curmudgeonly demeanor and resistance to change.

2. A slang term for obsolete technology.
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Experts from the Heyuan Dinosaur Museum (http://www.ladbible.com/news/interesting-boy-finds-11-dinosaur-eggs-in-china-20190726) confirmed that the find were indeed fossiled dinosaur eggs.
Attractions on the day included the opportunity to view a dinosaur hatching as well as coming face-toface with a life-size triceratops.
I mean, what can you do with dinosaurs? What can you do with a park?
Writer Aliki's My Visit to the Dinosaurs is a thought-stimulating, specialized, meticulous tour through dinosaur hall of a natural history museum.
Professor Mike Benton, co-author of the study, said: "It's unusual to be able to study the skin of a dinosaur, and the fact this is dandruff proves the dinosaur was not shedding its whole skin like a modern lizard or snake but losing skin fragments from between its feathers."
Dinosaurs appeal to everyone and this year we have tried to give something more, said an official from the Gulf Asia Development, the company that is managing the show at the Muscat Festival venue this year.
"In terms of how it shakes up our understanding of dinosaur evolution, Teleocrater shows that the earliest members of the dinosaur lineage were very unlike dinosaurs, and that many 'typical' features of dinosaurs accumulated in a step-wise fashion instead of all evolving at close to the same time."
We believed that dinosaurs have been classified in a certain way, and certain dinosaurs belonged to specific groups.
According to him, new dinosaur models manufactured in China have been brought to Amerat Park while an animal park featuring various animals' models was set up in Naseem Park this year.
"For the first time we have a feathered dinosaur that is far from the lineage leading to birds," says study coauthor Pascal Godefroit, a paleontologist at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels.
When a dinosaur made a track (probably not in cookie dough!) the conditions had to be just right in order for the tracks to stay and become fossils.
They found much more than they expected: dinosaur footprints, big and small, from both meat-and plant-eaters.