copyright

(redirected from Digital Millennium Copyright Act)
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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Provider Liability Law is also different from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.
Such programs are legal in Russia, but banned under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act.
Adobe contended the program violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), and once company officials heard Sklyarov was entering the country to speak at the Def Con convention (a "hacker-centric," gathering, says Newsweek), they called the authorities and the Russian was arrested.
Sklyarov is the first person to be criminally charged with violating the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which severely restricts a person's ability to disable the copyright protections built into various forms of digital media).
The laws around exactly what is and is not permitted under the latest Digital Millennium Copyright Act are still being interpreted in courthouses across the country.
have announced that they have settled the federal lawsuit brought by RealNetworks against Streambox under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act in December 1999.
As mandated in 1998's Digital Millennium Copyright Act (H.
On October 28, 1998, the President signed an amendment to the copyright law entitled the Digital Millennium Copyright Act which was designed to address some of the problems of digital media, particularly on the Internet.
This newly updated law book explains the anti-circumvention and anti-trafficking rules of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), the Act's provisions for protecting copyright management information (CMI), and its attempts to reduce Internet service providers' exposure to primary and secondary liability for copyright infringement.
Technology: Will the Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown 3D printing?
Elsevier is using the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to claim that the academics who authored the articles in its journals do not have the right to repurpose the articles on their personal websites -- a practice that is not necessarily legal, but long gone unpursued by publishers.
Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Internet companies can avoid being held liable, and hence sued, if they remove content that rights holders say infringes on their copyrights.

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