diffusion

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diffusion

the process whereby INNOVATIONS are accepted and used by firms and consumers through imitation, licensing agreements or sale of products and patents.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Alexander Goldenweiser, "Diffusionism and the American School of Historical Ethnology," American Journal of Sociology 31, no.
Levi-Strauss's early commitment to diffusionism was followed by a rejection of it, which identified diffusionism with history.
The theoretical apparatus is that of diffusionism, and cartography is the tool par excellence.
"Diffusionism: A Uniformitarian Critique." Annals of the Association of American Geographers 77 (1): 30-47.
The fact remais that the young Lele, in a kind of diffusionism, mixed their Christianity with their old religious beliefs, which they supposedly fought against.
Blaut, The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History (New York: Guilford Press, 1993); and idem, Eight Eurocentric Historians (New York: Guilford Press, 2000).
Rolt suggested that many boatpeople had Romani origins; this partly reflected Massingham's endorsement of the (discredited) ideas of diffusionism, which saw human culture as diffused from origins in Egyptian agriculture, with travelling people like the Romani acting as a direct mediating force.
In addition, study of change has been a major domain of research for the anthropologists who attempted to describe change from various theoretical standpoints like evolutionism, diffusionism, neo-evolutionism, socio-biology and many others.
In Franco Moretti's evolutionary model of worldwide genre diffusionism, translation is only mentioned in relation to specific rewriting patterns of Western novels during late-nineteenth century Japan, as if translation were a non-functional item of the whole world literary system (63n24).