diffusion

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diffusion

the process whereby INNOVATIONS are accepted and used by firms and consumers through imitation, licensing agreements or sale of products and patents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alexander Goldenweiser, "Diffusionism and the American School of Historical Ethnology," American Journal of Sociology 31, no.
Levi-Strauss's early commitment to diffusionism was followed by a rejection of it, which identified diffusionism with history.
(1993): The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History.
The theoretical apparatus is that of diffusionism, and cartography is the tool par excellence.
"Diffusionism: A Uniformitarian Critique." Annals of the Association of American Geographers 77 (1): 30-47.
The fact remais that the young Lele, in a kind of diffusionism, mixed their Christianity with their old religious beliefs, which they supposedly fought against.
Blaut, The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History (New York: Guilford Press, 1993); and idem, Eight Eurocentric Historians (New York: Guilford Press, 2000).
Rolt suggested that many boatpeople had Romani origins; this partly reflected Massingham's endorsement of the (discredited) ideas of diffusionism, which saw human culture as diffused from origins in Egyptian agriculture, with travelling people like the Romani acting as a direct mediating force.
In addition, study of change has been a major domain of research for the anthropologists who attempted to describe change from various theoretical standpoints like evolutionism, diffusionism, neo-evolutionism, socio-biology and many others.
In Franco Moretti's evolutionary model of worldwide genre diffusionism, translation is only mentioned in relation to specific rewriting patterns of Western novels during late-nineteenth century Japan, as if translation were a non-functional item of the whole world literary system (63n24).
Blaut's notion of Eurocentric "diffusionism." Blaut coined this term in reference to the British and French colonial empires, which considered the European center as the "maker of history" and others, on the periphery, as unable to innovate.