cut-throat competition

(redirected from Destructive Competition)

Cut-Throat Competition

Competition between two or more companies so fierce that they are unable to recoup the costs of making their products. This may happen especially if there are frequent or seasonal drops in demand. Over the long term, cut-throat competition is unsustainable for all companies involved. It is also called ruinous or destructive competition.

cut-throat competition

see PRICE WAR.
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1) Throughout the spring of 2014, terrorists lamented and counterterrorists rejoiced as open fighting between once-aligned jihadis brought destructive competition to the landscape, a blessing for Western countries who had no viable or palatable method to counter the rising jihadist tide in Syria.
One might even say destructive competition exists in selected markets that are Islamically over-banked.
If we continue the way we are going and competing with each other, it could lead to destructive competition and everyone will pay the price.
We have managed to achieve profitability in our core insurance activities by focusing on profitable business and staying away from destructive competition.
This letter declares climate change to be "symptomatic of a spiritual deficit" that is manifested in "excessive self interest, destructive competition and greed.
Scarce resources should not be wasted on destructive competition that will ultimately lead to a sub-optimized national port network.
Geithner said China's policy of keeping the renminbi cheap "sets off a dangerous dynamic" that encourages other countries to follow suit and risks touching off a destructive competition for jobs and trade.
This "managed competition" would foster collaboration among peak businesses, professionals, and trade associations in order to "steer a diverse economy away from destructive competition while maintaining product diversity, innovation, and productivity.
Some developing countries and anti-poverty campaigners accuse Brussels of arm-twisting poor states into agreements that could open up weak economies to destructive competition.
There is still a lot of destructive competition, particularly in the U.
In "Demand Uncertainty and Price Maintenance: Markdowns as Destructive Competition," Deneckere et al.