financial institution

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Financial institution

An enterprise such as a bank whose primary business and function is to collect money from the public and invest it in financial assets such as stocks and bonds, loans and mortgages, leases, and insurance policies.

Financial Institution

An organization, which may be either for-profit or non-profit, that takes money from clients and places it in any of a variety of investment vehicles for the benefit of both the client and the organization. Common examples of financial institutions are retail banks, which take deposits into safekeeping and use them to make loans to other customers, and insurance companies, which do not take deposits, but provide guarantees of payment if a certain situation occurs in exchange for a premium. See also: Depository institution, Non-depository institution.

Financial institution.

Any institution that collects money and puts it into assets such as stocks, bonds, bank deposits, or loans is considered a financial institution. There are two types of financial institutions: depository institutions and nondepository institutions.

Depository institutions, such as banks and credit unions, pay you interest on your deposits and use the deposits to make loans. Nondepository institutions, such as insurance companies, brokerage firms, and mutual fund companies, sell financial products.

Many financial institutions provide both depository and nondepository services.

financial institution

an institution that acts primarily as a FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY in channelling funds from LENDERS to BORROWERS (e.g. COMMERCIAL BANKS, BUILDING SOCIETIES), or from SAVERS to INVESTORS (e.g. PENSION FUNDS, INSURANCE COMPANIES). See FINANCIAL SYSTEM.

financial institution

an institution that acts primarily as a FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY in channelling funds from LENDERS to BORROWERS (e.g. COMMERCIAL BANKS, BUILDING SOCIETIES) or from SAVERS to INVESTORS (e.g. PENSION FUNDS, INSURANCE COMPANIES). See FINANCIAL SYSTEM.

financial institution

An organization that obtains money from deposits and earns money from loans.

References in periodicals archive ?
It found that at depository institutions, inconsistencies in depository institution regulators' examination activities can result in different conclusions regarding the safety and soundness of an institution as well as difficulties identifying emerging trends.
Seiffert was first appointed to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland's Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council in May 2014, and has been elected Chairman of the Council effective October 2015.
(iv) reduce inappropriate conflicts of interest between the self-interest of depository institutions, affiliates of depository institutions, and financial companies supervised by the Board, and the interests of the customers of such institutions and companies;
The effects of the banking industry's interstate consolidation are evident: All but five states now report that more than 15 percent of depository institution branches are part of an out-of-state bank or savings association.
An interest rate on excess reserves would act as a floor on overnight interbank lending rates; a depository institution would not likely lend balances to another institution at a lower interest rate than it could earn by keeping the excess funds in its account at the Federal Reserve.
However, he said it was important the benefits of the law's key reforms were not squandered by a sense of complacency that could "leave depository institutions needlessly vulnerable to future stress."
The adjusted monetary base combines in a single index Federal Reserve actions that affect the supply of base money - open market operations, discount window lending, and unsterilized foreign exchange market intervention - with actions that affect depository institutions' demand for base money - changes in statutory reserve requirements.
These annual adjustments, known as the reserve requirement exemption amount adjustment and the low reserve tranche adjustment, are based on growth in total reservable liabilities and net transaction accounts, respectively, at all depository institutions between June 30, 2015 and June 30, 2016.
NCUA Board Chairman Debbie Matz tasked the agency's Director of the Office of Minority and Women Inclusion to develop and administer the Minority Depository Institutions Preservation Program, which preserves and encourages minority depository institutions required by the law.
Over the same period, the total number of FDIC-insured depository institutions' offices increased almost 16 percent from 81,172 at the end to 1995 to 94,029 through the 3rd quarter of 2006.
The annual indexing of the low reserve tranche and the reserve requirement exemption amount is based on growth in net transaction accounts and total reservable liabilities, respectively, at all depository institutions between June 30, 2004, and June 30, 2005.

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