Dependent

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Dependent

Acceptance of a capital budgeting project contingent on the acceptance of another project.

Dependent

An individual for whom another individual is financially responsible. For example, if a working mother has a child, the child is her dependent. Likewise, if a man is taking care of his father in his old age, the father is a dependent. One may normally receive a tax credit for dependents. See also: Child Tax Credit.

Dependent

An individual who qualifies to be claimed as a dependent exemption on another person's income tax return.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consideration of organismic variables may also elucidate more historical causes of response classes and how maintaining factors have emerged over time by identifying past learning history (e.g., consistent positive reinforcement for the display of overly reliant behaviors during childhood for someone diagnosed with a dependent personality disorder) and physiological differences (e.g., temperamentally-based behavioral approach tendencies among people diagnosed with antisocial or borderline personality disorders).
Dependent personality disorder: Age, sex, and Axis I comorbidity.
Patients with the diagnosis of dependent personality disorder often present with the following characteristics (See DSM-IV criteria, APA, 1994; Greenberg and Bornstein, 1988):
Chapters have been updated and those on research, clinical assessment, dependent personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder have been rewritten.
After which, each chapter focuses on a patient and the presentation of some symptom or issue, such as: panic disorder, chronic depression, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, conduct disorder, bulimia, anorexia, and dependent personality disorder. The contributors are largely psychologists teaching at U.
For example, a female with dependent personality disorder might be happily married to an overbearing spouse; or an individual with schizoid personality disorder might be in a solitary job position that produces no impairment or distress.
Individuals exhibiting a dependent personality disorder cannot function on their own.

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