Dependency Ratio

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Dependency Ratio

The ratio of the rough number of persons who are financially dependent on another person to the rough number of persons of working age, expressed as a percentage. The dependency ratio shows how easy or difficult it is for the persons of working age to take care of those who are not of working age. It is calculated thus:

Dependency ratio = (Number of persons under 15 + Number of persons over 65) / (Number of persons between 15 and 65) *100
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing life expectancy is leading to higher old-age dependency ratios.
To capture the average effect of demographic variables on emerging and Asian countries' consumption shares, we use the young and old dependency ratios as independent variables.
Australia, the United States, and Poland all have OAD ratios of less than 20 per cent, but their retirement dependency ratios are much higher, ranging from 30 per cent in Australia to 39 pwer cent in the US and 63 per cent in Poland.
The prime working age population is projected to fall to one of the smallest in Europe as a share of total population in the coming decades, leading to high old age dependency ratios.
Most successful or sustainable economies have dependency ratios somewhere close to the .
High youth dependency ratios can be seen as a leading indicator of labor force growth, as it represents a future stock of individuals that will enter the labor force," the rating agency added.
American foreign energy dependency ratios have collapsed
Like in other parts of the world and consistent with earlier studies, family size and dependency ratios are linked to poverty dynamics.
However, little progress toward reducing fertility achieved in this part of the world has positive impact on dependency ratios, continue to fall.
Despite Namibia's decline in the human dependency ratios the human development report 2013 has shown that Namibia's performance still leaves more to be desired based on its income per capita and relatively small population.
The report analyses age dependency ratios (in other words, the level of support to the two dependent generations - the under-15s and those 65 years of older) from the working age population (aged 15-64).
This puts severe pressure on dependency ratios: By 2050 it is estimated that the elderly dependency ratio will be almost 75%, meaning there will be almost three retirees for every four people of working age.
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