demography

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demography

the analysis of human POPULATIONS according to their total size, birth rates, death rates and migration; the age and sex distribution of populations and their geographical and occupational distributions; racial and religious profiles, etc.

Firms need to monitor changes in the demographic environment because these changes can have a significant impact on the demand for particular CONSUMER GOODS and SERVICES. For instance, the increase in the proportions of elderly citizens in the total population in most industrialized countries over recent decades has created new market opportunities for companies in such areas as health care and leisure products; while declining birth rates have reduced the demand for children's clothing and toys. See SOCIOECONOMIC GROUP.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

demography

the study of human POPULATIONS, including their total size, population changes over time as determined by changes in BIRTH RATES, DEATH RATES and MIGRATION; the age and sex distribution of populations and their geographical and occupational distributions. Statistical data on populations is compiled from CENSUSES of population and records of births, See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

demography

A study of the characteristics of people living in an area.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To understand the importance of the compositional changes and of the changes in the labor force participation rates of different demographic groups, we first present counterfactual exercises to quantify the impact of these changes on the aggregate labor force participation rate.
Performing the same exercise as we did for gender for different demographic groups shows the same basic result: different means, but no difference in the medians.
Among different demographic groups, the most significant declines in labor force participation have been observed among the young and among working-age women (see Cohany and Sok 2007; Lerman 2007; Mosisa and Hipple 2006; Hotchkiss 2006; Bradbury and Katz 2005; and Kirkland 2002).
The specific objectives are both to fill in for historically non-existent official data and to make projections by demographic group for the next decade.
To the contrary, black women were the only demographic group in the state showing an increase in voter participation in that election.
It is estimated that by the year 2008, women between the ages of fifty and sixty-five will be the largest demographic group in the United States.
[For purposes of measurement, the dollar index ranges from 80 to 120, with 80 and below skewing away from a specific demographic group purchasing wine and 120 and over skewing toward a specific demographic group purchasing wine; 80 to 120 is the normal range.]
According to Mass.-based research firm Gazelle Systems, the boomers are behind the growth of meatloaf on restaurant menus, ordering the comfort food more than any other demographic group.
Casinos have learned to feed the needs of seniors--a demographic group that they recognize as growing, according to McNeilly.
Almost every demographic group identified in the survey--including males, females, whites, blacks, Hispanics, non-Hispanics, and 12-to 14-year-olds-experienced less violent crime in 2000 than they did during 1999.
Think Pontiac Aztek but "cooler." Good idea, wrong demographic group.
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