Democrat

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Democrat

A person or scholar who believes in self-rule in a polity. In a democracy, the citizens vote on issues of governance. Often, the term also refers to a republican, who believes that citizens should elect representatives who vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trick for Democrats will be to delve deeply into the failures and cover-ups of the Bush administration in these areas, without allowing the GOP or the press to portray their probes as needlessly partisan, vindictive, and backward-looking.
On the campaign trails, House Democrats aggressively called for a substantial increase in Pell Grants, which the government awards to low-income college students.
But animosity between Golden State Republicans and Democrats runs so deep, some say, that rebuilding trust may have to be the first order of business.
In most of the states where the bans did pass--South Carolina and Idaho being the exceptions--voters elected Democrats to major statewide offices anyway.
Even though politicians should never be trusted to do what they say, irrespective of whether they are Republicans or Democrats, most of them will pay attention to their constituents rather than to the special interests--if enough of their constituents become informed and involved and keep the feet of their representatives to the fire.
She went on to become the national chair for the College Democrats of America's GLBT Caucus and currently serves as the CDA's national political affairs director.
Democrats will have to struggle to hold on to New Jersey, where Senator Robert Menendez, appointed in 2006, is in trouble as Republican State Senator Tom Kean moves up in the polls.
In the December Cook Political Report/RT Strategies national poll of Democrats and independents who leaned to the Democratic side and planned to vote in Democratic caucuses and primaries, 33 percent supported Clinton, 17 percent Kerry, the 2004 nominee, 15 percent backed former North Carolina Senator John Edwards, Kerry's running mate in 2004, then a similar drop off to what was seen on the GOP side occurred.
When African Americans are mad at the Democrats, they don't vote Republican.