Democracy

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Democracy

Self-rule in a polity. In a democracy, the citizens vote on issues of governance. Often, the term also refers to a republic, in which citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
While this is a very important point, the authors overlook that the masquerade of power and despotism in democratic regimes is just an instance of a more general phenomenon that is not unique to democracies Whoever is in power under whatever political system has an incentive to create and spread an ideological justification for their position in order to protect it.
To reverse the process requires not just an alternative economic program based on justice, equity, and ecological stability, but a new democratic system to replace the liberal democratic regime that has become so vulnerable to elite and foreign capture.
Another advantage enjoyed by military governments is that they are less prone to political instability as compared to democratic regimes.
The existing security institutions and experience with their activities necessarily condition further decisions on the way of setting up the new democratic regime.
Democratic regime has been contributing more in the growth of external debts.
By focusing on poor indicators of instability such as coups, revolutions, and political assassinations, the current literature has failed to differentiate between the collapse of democratic and authoritarian rules or whether democratic regimes collapse for the same reasons as do authoritarian regimes.
Such a trust is founded on the assumption that democratic regimes are inherently not militant, not aggressive, and by their very nature peace-loving.
This does not mean that every test favored the social democratic regime.
Noting that the introduction of national systems of secondary education paralleled the growing importance of middle classes, Caron nonetheless concludes that the high school was less important for the "social promotion" celebrated by democratic regimes like the Third Republic than for functioning as a "normative agent" dispensing "general culture" and discipline to future elites.
The weakest portion of Rummel's reply, however, is his attempt to deal with the embarrassing point that during the Cold War the United States government overthrew democratic regimes in other countries.
It is necessary to question whether the social, political, and economic milieu in which democratic regimes must operate is sufficiently different from previous periods to allow the consolidation of democracy where it has failed in the past.
14, 2014) Kinzer argued, in brief, that the United States had encouraged its friends in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya to establish democratic regimes.

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