Dematerialization


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Dematerialization

The process by which stocks and other securities cease to be represented by a physical certificate and become electronically recorded. Dematerialization has gradually become more common as computers have become more sophisticated and exchanges increasingly decide to close their trading floors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, Simmons (2002) argues for the introduction of a difference between the paradigm of immaterialisation and the perspective of dematerialisation, even if Immaterialisation was understood as a kind of Dematerialization (Hoorens et al 2004).
Im/ Dematerialization of economies is wanted to be a new way of approaching organic or synergistic economy, the one in which the individual has to choose between a polluting consume and a sustainable one.
Dematerialization of the management and payment of travel expenses: - management of professional trips, - management of expense claims and mileage allowances, - consolidation management.
By the time John Coplans took over Artforum magazine in 1971, I had stopped writing, but he wheedled, cajoled, and finally lured me back with the offer to review Lucy Lippard's Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object.
Among those who pioneered the artwork's dematerialization, few were as committed in their efforts as Robert Barry.
Contract notice: dematerialization of supplier invoice flows
Little-known outside Japan until recently (they are building an addition for the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio), Sejima and Nishizawa design structures that embody all the formal and experiential qualities Lambri celebrates in architecture: reflection and dematerialization, opacity and transparency, intimacy and expansiveness.
At the opening session, Pedro Agostinho de Neri, President of the Association of Secretaries-General of Portuguese-Speaking Parliaments and Secretary-General of the National Assembly, reinforced the importance of dematerialization for the modernization of services.
Palermo offers us an endless play of optical and mental flicker, signs of a painter protesting both the constraints of modernist criticism and the then current "dematerialization of art." The metal pictures are thus resonant of their time.
The Portuguese-language parliaments jointly analyze the best practices for the modernization of their services, which inevitably passes through the process of parliamentary dematerialization.
Indeed, aside from dematerialization, he doesn't have much in common with Weiner and Kosuth.