Delors Report

Delors Report

A report outlining a three-phase plan to integrate the markets and currencies of Europe. It laid the foundation for the establishment of the European Union in 1993 and led to the introduction of the euro in 1999. The report was presented in 1989 by the European Commission, at the time presided over by Jacque Delors.
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In 1989, the Delors Report planned for the development of a common currency through gradual moves toward closer economic coordination among EU nations and toward full implementation of the European Monetary System with an independent European Central Bank (ECB).
Twenty-one years have elapsed since the presentation of the Delors Report in April 1989 and 11 years since the establishment of the European Monetary Union (FMU) on 1 January 1999.
2) This 1996 report to UNESCO, often referred to as the Delors Report, remains the touchstone of many progressive educators.
Turning from initiation to mediation, the Delors Report, the blueprint for EMU issued by the Delors Committee under his chairmanship, is often seen as a personal triumph.
The remarkable stability of the system in its initial years encouraged acceptance of the Delors report in 1989 and the signing of the Maastricht treaty in 1991.
This question is addressed in the MacDougall Report (1977), the Delors Report (1989), and the Maastricht Treaty (1991).
14) The Delors Report on EMU was published in 1989 and set the stage for what was later to be incorporated in the TEU.
The Delors Report (1989) provided further impetus towards monetary unification in Europe.
The EC has accepted the principles set out in the 1989 Delors Report as its blueprint to move towards European Monetary Union (EMU).
In 1989, the Delors Report set out a detailed plan for a federal European superstate.
On this question, the Delors Report [1989] emphasizes that a national government budget deficit in a monetary union should be bound by explicit rules.
For example, such issues included in the past the British budgetary problem, finally settled at the 1984 European Summit, and the decision to go ahead with stage one of the Delors Report on European Monetary Unification at the 1989 Summit.