Deferred Success

Deferred Success

A euphemism for failure with the (perhaps slim) possibility of success later. For example, if a marketing campaign failed to achieve better sales numbers, but the company wishes to portray the hope that the sales numbers will improve later, it may call the campaign a deferred success.
References in periodicals archive ?
educator made national headlines when she eliminated the word 'failed' from progress report cards, replacing it instead with 'deferred success'.
At last year's conference, members called for the word "failure" to be deleted from the educational vocabulary and replaced with the concept of "deferred success".
'Everyone has to fit in with the crowd.' Last year the conference heard calls from PAT members to delete the word 'failure' from the educational vocabulary and replace it with the concept of 'deferred success'.: Clever ADJECTIVE:The Collins English dictionary definition of 'clever' 1 Displaying sharp intelligence or mental alertness.
I'm not a big fan of deferred success. Another word for that is failure."
Failure has to be referred to as "deferred success".
Last month the Professional Association of Teachers debated whether or not the word "fail" should be outlawed in the classroom, to be replaced by the term "deferred success".
Shadow education secretary David Cameron said: "You don't do any favours to anybody by calling failure deferred success."
That said 'deferred success' shows a lack of catchy phrase-making ability.
A British teachers' association will consider a proposal to replace the concept of "failure" in the classroom with something called "deferred success." The idea, which sounds more Californian than British, is to avoid bruising children's self-esteem.
Should the term 'failure' be eradicated from the educational vocabulary and replaced with 'deferred success'?
Liz is going to tell delegates they must stop using the word "failure" when describing pupils' work and must instead call it "deferred success".
DEFERRED SUCCESS: TV Chef Nigella Lawson doesn't quite cut it as a presenter