Deep Pockets


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Deep Pockets

A slang term for wealth or an exceptionally wealthy investor. See also: Angel investor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reds fans with deep pockets could have the ultimate status symbol to adorn their vehicle
Greek politicians seek potential handouts from Russia and other nations with deep pockets - and an illusion of independence
Deep Pockets was an even unlikelier winner of the amateur riders' handicap chase for the Gay Kindersley Salver, as favourite Strongbows Legend winged away until arrowing into the turf three out.
In any case, the deep pockets of the world are looking east to Asia.
While any reasonable price control legislation looks unlikely to materialize as long as our politicians remain in the deep pockets of the drug industry and its powerful lobby, we taxpayers are the ones paying for it.
We have a long-standing, clear, and consistent policy of not allowing advocacy ads so that deep pockets cannot control one side of a public policy debate, be it conservative or liberal,'' a network official said.
For example, on the shakeout conveyor, castings with shallow to deep pockets were filled with sand, which resulted in increased sand to the landfill and longer shot blast times.
677") are slightly larger than the KAB6 body, enhancing their ability to reach into deep pockets for applications close to walls or other obstacles without interfering with the tool shank body.
But how long can Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son fight against the deep pockets of an NTT banded together with the sole purpose of eliminating pesky price-cutters like Softbank?
No, but Kimberly-Clark has deep pockets to be picked," said an article in the May 13 Forbes magazine.
This is especially true now that "the larger companies with deep pockets realize it is much more expedient to be sensitive to [gay issues]," says Kermit Johns, president of Christopher Street Financial, a New York-based investment and advisory firm.
Plenty of good work is going unheralded because PR firms don't want to get involved in what has become a costly, rules-bound ritual dominated by a few firms with deep pockets.