Debt swap

(redirected from Debt-for-Nature Swap)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Debt swap

A set of transactions in which a firm buys a country's dollar bank debt at a discount and swaps this debt with the central bank for local currency that it can use to acquire local equity. Also called a debt-equity swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
Debt-for-nature swaps can therefore be useful financial mechanisms for helping countries reduce debt without destroying their most valuable natural resources.
counterparty in a debt-for-nature swap may include favorable publicity,
These initiatives, called debt-for-nature swaps, typically involved restructuring, reducing, or buying a portion of a developing country's outstanding debt, with a percentage of proceeds (in local currency) being used to support conservation programs within the debtor country.
Debt-for-nature swaps generated a great deal of publicity for the international conservation NGOs, such as The Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund and Conservation International, who pioneered them in the 1980s.
Under George Bush's Enterprise for Americas Initiative (EAI), the United States government completed the first government to government debt-for-nature swap.
Debt-for-nature swaps, such as this one, are designed to free up resources in debtor countries for much needed conservation activities.
Since Madagascar lacked the funds to carry out the intensive conservation programmes these efforts required, in 1989 the WWF, with the aid of a matching grant from USAID, engineered a multi-million dollar debt-for-nature swap to help Madagascar expand and deepen its national environmental programmes.
Asi, el interes que tienen los paises con grandes riquezas naturales en la reduccion de su deuda externa y el interes que tienen los paises industrializados en la conservacion de la naturaleza se pueden combinar mediante un Canje de Deuda Externa por Conservacion de la Naturaleza ( Debt-for-Nature Swaps [swap (del ingles): cambio, canje).
Yet Gore, along with many mainstream environmental groups, pushes market-based solutions, such as emissions trading and debt-for-nature swaps, that increase environmental inequities.
Although debt-debt and debt-equity swaps were discussed in several papers, there was no mention of debt-for-nature swaps in which debtor nations that are rich in biological resources are allowed to reduce debt in return for preventing wilderness areas.
Finally, he notes that several research institutions in Brazil would like to explore debt-for-science swaps modeled on the well-publicized debt-for-nature swaps.