dead load

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dead load

The weight of a building,not counting the occupants and furnishings.

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Also, the multiplier for the long-term deflection due to the superimposed dead load at any time can be expressed by the following equation:
According to ACI 318, the analyzed area must be loaded to 0.85 (1.4D + 1.7L), including dead load already present.
while the thrust force associated with the effect of the dead load g can be obtained from the following:
The moment diagram included the impact of self-weight (DL), superimposed dead load (SDL), live load (LL), top prestressing tendons (TP) and bottom prestressing tendons (BTP).
It is noticed that this behavior is undesirable because the uncertainties implicit on live load are higher than those corresponding to dead loads. Also, it can be noticed in Figure 3 that the reliability associated with high-strength concrete sections is smaller than the reliability associated with ordinary concrete sections.
The aim of the optimization problem is to find the optimal distribution of the elements' cross-section parameters U0 of the structure, subjected to VRL and dead loads with such additional conditions of biparametrical optimization principle: during optimization the biparameters [[PI].sub.0]-[[PI].sub.1] satisfie the nonlinear boundary conditions (13) of characteristics' fields [[OMEGA].sub.s] (14) of steel profile assortments (Fig.
In load factor rating calculations, dead loads (D) are permanent loads that do not change as a function of time.
Within the category of vertical loads there are several types: dead loads, live loads, snow loads, wind (uplift), and seismic.
It requires students to demonstrate that they know how to turn on and off the computer; prioritize and apply appropriate safety measures when working with agricultural and related biotechnologies; calculate quantitatively the resultant forces for live loads and dead loads; etc.
In the case of a support for a zip line, the loads are highly variable and are comprised of a combination of live and dead loads that are not always acting directly towards the ground.
Next, the engineer applies dead loads and live loads as transmitted through the fill.