Dead Presidents


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Dead Presidents

In the United States, a slang term for money. The term derives from the fact that the faces of past U.S. presidents appear on some bills.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carlson begins his introduction with a question: "What is the job of a dead president?"; and he ends the introduction by concluding that "being a dead president is about as close to civic immortality as one gets in this part of the world.
of highjacking dead presidents, militancy a drama deferred--a moody
If it's got more receipts than faces of dead presidents, it's time to lighten your back pocket.
Among specific topics are sharing Sputnik, the Seabiscuit sweepstakes, violent novels in a violent world, strangers in the night, best American fiction from the last 25 years, diagramming sentences, catfight in the newsroom, libraries and librarians in the movies, first firsts, and sex with dead presidents.
All they care about is the bottom line, the profit margin, the moolah, the green stuff, the what-have-you-done-for-me-lately, the bread, the scratch, the dead presidents, it's all about the Benjamins (baby)C*and being nice is nice-but-not-necessary.
He writes, "Blank paper you could at least write on, but governments manage to make it completely worthless by printing pictures of dead presidents on it." That's a great line, but it's false.
Ninth degree, burned stardom dust of dead presidents.
The Chinese get the dead presidents from selling products to live Americans, who seem ready to consume anything that comes their way.
A high school student, she remembered, wanted to know the average speed of funeral trains--the kind dead presidents rode--versus the average speed of a vacation train through Copper Canyon.
Sure, you could spend gobs of money taking Aunt Mimi and her three disastrous offspring to the Newport Aquarium, or the Oregon Zoo in Portland, but that'll set you back some dead presidents.
finishes commemorating dead presidents, the Federal Communications Commission should be poised to adjourn its extended holiday.
What is new in my time is the unbridled fetish of consumption, the pursuit of what in hip-hop parlance is called "bling"--spacious cribs, sparkling jewels, and a roll of dead Presidents. But this particular obsession is unique to neither black people nor youth; hip-hop just expresses it with more flair.