Day trading

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Day trading

Establishing and liquidating the same position or positions within one day's trading.

Day Trade

An investment practice in which one buys (or sells short) a security and then sells (or buys) the same security in the same trading day. That is, a day trade involves the opening and the closing of a position on the same trading day, in order to profit from short-term changes in price. For example, a day trader may buy Stock A at $15 per share because he/she believes it will be $17 a few minutes or hours later. The activities in which day traders engage are high risk because there is no guarantee that the price will move in the desired direction. However, day traders provide a great deal of liquidity to the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although swing traders tend to trade less volatile pairs than day traders, thus eliminating some of the risks of unpredictable market movements, they usually trade in high volumes, since major swings comes less frequently in the market, and often have to face the risks of overnight trading.
Day traders will hit the sell button and the carbon bubble will pop.
But, even the home based day trader, who enters orders manually, will see a huge improvement in their overall trading experience," continued Hazelcorn.
Investors) have to battle the fear and greed,'' said Christopher Worsh, a professional day trader and editor of Day Trading It, a daily stock picking newsletter.
It was at that time Hasegawa learned about the existence of the Japan Day Traders Association lectures.
Without wishing to sound like an anthropologist, the day trader was a familiar sight in pubs, offices and anywhere when three or more gathered to celebrate the word, and the word was shares.
In the October 2000 JofA, we explained how day traders could report their gains and losses on schedule C ("Paying the Piper: Some Tax Rules for Day Traders," page 115).
There are many things hapless day traders can learn if not shielded from their ill-advised financial decisions, not least of which are the complexities of economics, the stock market, and international finance.
In general, professional day traders must have a minimum of $25,000 to open an account, but individual investors can begin online trading for as little as $100 and the price of a computer.
From the IRS's viewpoint, are these day traders investors, traders or self-employed dealers in securities?
Day Traders On-line provides a number of stock related services, both free and subscription based via their website at http://www.