Analysis

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Analysis

The practice of examining information to determine what conclusions it indicates,. The information observed in analysis depends on the type of analysis being conducted. For example, technical analysis uses statistics to determine future price movements of securities, while fundamental analysis looks at indicators of a company's intrinsic value. Analysis may involve qualitative or quantitative information, or both. Most forms of analysis have both strengths and weaknesses.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Production data analysis is accounted as a method to evaluate reservoir parameters as well-test is but it uses different data types.
Once the capabilities are understood and it's determined that a forensic data analysis would be beneficial, a detailed scope can be formed.
For the purpose of multidimensional data analysis enabling creation and administration of data cubes we used OLAP module created by Business Intelligence Development Studio (BIDS) (Larson, 2009), (Webb et al., 2009).
Consequently, the probability of a failure occurring during a long-running data analysis task is relatively high; Google, for example, reports an average of 1.2 failures per analysis job [1].
Citrus Technology Ltd is a UK-based software company, founded in 2006, that is dedicated to the development of simple, affordable and easy-to-use data analysis tools for all data sources.
From my point of view, the data analysis is of course valuable, but the tips on learning are priceless.
As data mining is known to be a time-consuming, laborious endeavor, without guaranties that interesting and potentially useful patterns will be revealed, we were prepared to the creation of large number of data models and trial-and-error approach to data analysis. Some models, such as the clustering model which divided the SMEs according to the main problems they were facing in everyday business operations (lack of available funds, complex administrative and legislative regulations, disharmony with standards, insufficient market information, etc.) resulted in interesting findings.
The book's main strength is that it describes basic statistical concepts for spatial data analysis and explains them and their relevance clearly in a single volume in a consistent manner.
"Balancing Yin and Yang: Teaching and Learning Qualitative Data Analysis within an Undergraduate Quantitative Data Analysis Course." Teaching Sociology 30: 348-360.
Down near the bottom, select "Data Analysis." (If you do not see the "Data Analysis" option, it may not have been installed.
While the NPBEA standards require principals to look at statistics and data analysis, very little training on how to gather and analyze data to make informed decisions is provided in the training manual or in many preparation programs.

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