Hazardous Material

(redirected from Dangerous goods)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Dangerous goods: IATA, IMDG code, TDG

Hazardous Material

Material that may cause damage because of its inherent nature. Examples include toxic or radioactive items. Most countries have regulations restricting the transportation of hazardous material. For example, the transporter may be required to take certain precautions or may not be permitted to transport in bulk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The UAE General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) is hosting the International Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel Meeting from 7th till 11th of November 2010 at the Park Rotana Hotel in Abu Dhabi.
A definition of demand for transport in terms of time is of great importance for defining time restriction on transporting this kind of dangerous goods in the area of Belgrade as well as for establishing a relevant period on the basis of which the features of demand for transport in terms of space are defined.
The updated Act would remain focused on the prevention of incidents when dangerous goods are offered, handled, transported or imported.
For shippers of dangerous goods by air, Tillman suggests five key actions:
Timely provision of the required documents to the air authorities of China and absence of incidents involving dangerous goods transport allowed to extend Uzbekistan's permission for the transportation of dangerous goods.
The instructions are a critical contribution of ICAO to the subject of dangerous goods in air transport.
The next step to support the up-and-coming chemical industry in the Gulf region is definite: RSA-Talke is planning to build a large dangerous goods capable container terminal in the Jebel Ali.
However, for formaldehyde solution options that are considered dangerous goods, all shippers must be trained and certified before they are authorized to offer their shipments for transport.
The workshop covered a range of topics including transporting dangerous goods and waste safely, the impact of the current regulations and enforcement and prosecution.
The course is led by NECC's international trade adviser John Christal who has over 30 years of operational and commercial experience and specific expertise in the worldwide movement of dangerous goods.
The demand for the secure shipment of dangerous goods is of paramount importance as international governments increasingly recognise the need to ensure safe passage for products, flight personnel, passengers and the general public.
The European Agreement concerning International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Waterways (ADN) entered into force in February 2008.

Full browser ?