U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Also called HHS. A cabinet-level body of the U.S. federal government responsible for protecting the public health. It conducts drug inspections, assists in the implementation of Medicare and Medicaid, runs the health service for Native Americans, and performs many similar operations. Until 1995, it also administered the Social Security Administration. It was created in 1953 and took its current form in 1980.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Whether this was because of DHHS or ONC remains unclear.
Working together we can strive to reach DHHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius' goal to make the next generation tobacco-free.
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Keeping the health plan you have: the Affordable Care Act and "grandfathered" health plans, 2010, (http://www.heatthcare.gov/news/factsheets/keeping_the_health_plan_you_have_grandfathered.html), accessed Feb.
Expecting to fund protocols using ES or EG cells, NIH scheduled a meeting for 25 April 2001 to review grant applications, only to be ordered to postpone the meeting pending a review of the proposed policy by DHHS. The members of the panel, except for the chair, have not been announced.
The target counties are characterized by lower accessibility to health care, with relatively low ratios of physicians, registered nurses, and hospital beds (US DHHS, 1993).
After legislators made several unsuccessful attempts to add such restrictions to Title X authorizations in Congress, President Reagan announced in July 1987 that he had formally instructed the DHHS to institute changes in the administration of the Title X program.
The NC DHHS cannot meet these challenges without changing the approach to managing the agency's programs and services.
The state has already received $95 million from the DHHS. Iowa officials expect the payment schedule to amount to $112 million in 2001, $106 million in 2002, and $24 million in 2003.
The second workshop focused on policy issues related to a coordinated approach to age standardization within DHHS (2).
Many commentators have criticized the "Baby Doe regulations" issued by DHHS in 1985 as embodying a "medical indications policy," that leaves inadequate room for moral considerations, such as parental values, in decisionmaking about treatment for seriously ill or impaired newborns.