Cutoff point

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Cutoff point

The lowest rate of return acceptable on investments.

Cutoff Point

The required rate of return needed to make an investment worth the expense. The cutoff point is subject and varies from investor to investor. However, in general, cutoff points vary by risk. That is, the cutoff point is almost higher for a riskier investment, meaning that the investor will not invest in a risky venture that is unlikely to have a high rate of return. Some investors adopt cutoff points as their personal investment policies, while others decide based on the situation.
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An NC cut-off point corresponding with a high sensitivity is important for screening purposes.
Malky Mackay is hoping to bring in cover before tomorrow afternoon's cut-off point for loan signings
This cut-off point seems to be universally accepted, and for the time being represents the best-known criterion for defining acute leukemia; however, "arbitrary" may still precede the criterion due to the follow:
The ROC curve and the AUC analysis appear to be useful methods for selecting an optimum cut-off point in the scale to maximise both sensitivity and specificity.
In some studies delay has been considered a continuous variable (usually in days) without an explicit cut-off point between participants considered as "delayers" or "nondelayers.
He assigns each animal an "autonomy value" and asks which value is the cut-off point for treating animals as non-intelligent beings, unworthy of rights.
n INCAPACITY BENEFIT is means-tested and your income puts you above the cut-off point for it.
Using a cut-off point of [absolute value of 50], one item failed to load on any factor.
But the first priority has to be 40 points, which is what they call the cut-off point for safety.
ONTARIO -- Ontario Superior Court Justice Arthur Gans stopped the provincial government from cutting off the financial support for autism treatment to Andrew Lowrey who has reached the age of six, the government's cut-off point.
As The Grocer went to press, Imperial Tobacco, which owns Britain's best-selling cigarette brand Lambert & Butler, was advising retailers that they should no longer honour any vouchers after Thursday (Feb 13), the cut-off point for advertising and promotions.