Country risk

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Country risk

The general level of political, financial, and economic uncertainty in a country which impacts the value of the country's bonds and equities. See:Sovereign risk.

Country Risk

The risk that a foreign government will significantly alter its policies or other regulations so that it negatively impacts the business climate in that country or the returns on a particular industry, company, or project. Macro-country risk deals with policy changes that harm, say, exporters or foreign-owned businesses in general, while micro-country risk implies that a government will deliberately target a particular company or way of making a living. For example, the political climate of a country in which defense contractors operate may turn against one particular company because of its perceived excesses or against defense contractors in general. This may cause the government revoke contracts for one or more defense contractors See also: Reputational risk, political risk, sovereign risk, geographic risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The division specializes in offering insurance for cross-border risks and related services for European corporate clients.
coverage and cross-border risks such as asset seizures or government overthrow.
It also helps companies structure captive insurance programs and controlled master programs for handling cross-border risks. The organization consists of a global network of multinational risk management units that provide underwriting and support services; underwriting services that handle the U.S.
The Tax Consortium covers Tax Liability exposure for domestic and cross-border risks. It was formed to provide higher limits in response to greater market utilization of tax liability insurance for transactional protection.
In presenting a new revised proposal, the Commission notes that the cross-border risks from the operation of nuclear installations have only led to limited standardisation of safety requirements between member states.
This will allow the provision of sex-disaggregated and analyzed data for decision making for Central Asian governments and facilitate regional dialogue about cross-border risks from communicable diseases.