defendant

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defendant

The party sued in an action at law.Contrast actions in equity,in which the party sued is called a respondent.Today,these distinctions are largely irrelevant,but they may be encountered when reading old legal decisions.

References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, ending the county's GPS and electronic monitoring program for criminal defendants was a bad decision by the county board.
Because the raw probit results are difficult to interpret, however, we present the marginal effects of each variable on the probability of a justice voting for the criminal defendant.
A postconviction-relief (PCR) appeal is initiated by a convicted criminal defendant (55) filing a notice of appeal in the district court, also within thirty days of a final judgment--usually an order denying postconviction relief.
Vincent Puglisi was a criminal defendant who was charged with the brutal murder of Alan Shalleck.
An earlier opinion from Missouri states that it is impermissible for a lawyer to advise a criminal defendant to relinquish claims of ineffective assistance of counsel by that lawyer, because the lawyer cannot properly ask the client to waive this type of personal conflict.
42) A criminal defendant must have the option of taking the wheel and appearing pro se because in some circumstances, precluding him from doing so is essentially robbing him of his constitutional right to a defense.
But when Lane County Circuit Judge Mary Ann Bearden ordered Kidd transported to the mental hospital last week, the 56-year-old Springfield woman joined 104 other Oregon criminal defendants whose court cases can't proceed because they lack the lucidity to assist in their defense against the charges.
In Padilla v Kentucky, 130 S Ct 1473 (2010), the United States Supreme Court recently held that the Sixth Amendment right to effective assistance of competent counsel requires that the criminal defendant be advised of the deportation consequences of a guilty plea before it is entered.
The Court offered three reasons that it considered "good enough" to justify Arizona's decision to prohibit a criminal defendant from presenting mental disorder evidence for the purpose of disproving mens rea: some mental disorder diagnoses are not generally accepted; (118) expert testimony about mental disorder can potentially mislead jurors; (119) and diminished capacity evidence is particularly untrustworthy.
At the federal level, a criminal defendant is "entitled to rather limited discovery, with no general right to obtain the statements of the [g]overnment's witnesses before they have testified.
of Virginia ruled that a criminal defendant must maintain the same