Guild

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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was a social system that predicated respect for privileges, the right of self-government of corporations (as the craft guilds), and the political participation of these privileged groups in urban society.
Unlike other craft guilds, the Weavers enjoyed a measure of stability from both the lengthy apprenticeship required of weaving, which deterred members of other guilds from illegally performing their craft, and staggering fines payable by foreigners to the Weavers for setting up shop in order to ply their trade.
In Iran a de facto alliance between the merchant and craft guilds was formed against European and Russian companies, who began gradually to take over a greater part of the Iranian commerce.
Alfred Kieser ["Organizational, Institutional, and Societal Evolution: Medieval Craft Guilds and the Genesis of Formal Organizations"] is a professor in the Faculty of Business Administration, University of Mannheim, Schloss, D-6800 Mannheim, Federal Republic of Germany.
When the Flemish criers and shouters were disrupting the meetings of the councils of deans of craft guilds in Bruges or Ghent, this was precisely what they were doing.
Royal Mail spokesman Mr Giles Finnemore said: "Starting from medieval craft guilds, the Workers' Tale stamps chart the evolution of work in these isles."
Compagnonnage emerged out of and drew upon Medieval and Early Modern craft guilds and confraternal associations.
Earlier this month 17 women made history when they were sworn in as the first ever female members of the City of Durham Freemen's ancient craft guilds, which are thought to have been established seven centuries ago.
Within the church were a number of guild chapels associated mainly with the city's most powerful craft guilds. These included the Draper's Chapel, Girdler's Chapel, Dyer's Chapel, Capper's Chapel and Mercer's Chapel.
Dr Robinson thinks that craft guilds, such as the English Cathedral Worshipful Company of Carpenters of the City of London, could play a vital role in training young people on the scheme.
The plays began life as church dramas performed by the clergy, but the idea was soon taken over by various craft guilds, who each held pageant houses (store rooms) in various parts of the city.
The group were sworn in as the very first women members of the City of Durham Freemen's ancient craft guilds at a ceremony in Durham Town Hall.