Covado

Covado

A Portuguese measure of length approximately equivalent to 0.66 meters. It became obsolete after Lusophone countries adopted the metric system in the 19th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
[...] e eu [Odisseu], arrancando da espada cortante de junto da coxa, um fosso abri, que de todos os lados um covado mede, e libacoes, a sua volta, fizemos a todos os mortos: primeiramente, de mel misturado; depois, de bom vinho; de agua a terceira, espalhando farinha por cima de tudo.
Contenido estomacal del camaron Penaeus vannamei en estanques en la isla del Covado. Tesis Profesional.
To better understand the accounting at the SFC, in a footnote we provide a brief outline of the 18th century Portuguese systems of weight (arratel), length (covado), and currency (real).
The quality of production was controlled and the cost per covado was computed.
The output was 66 1/2 covados so that the unit cost was approximately 1$301 reis per covado.
Full cost per covado was defined in a fashion similar to the French prix de revient, the total cost accounting system that Nikitin [1990] found at Saint-Gobain between 1820 and 1880 and that Bordazar proposed in the Spanish printing industry in 1732 [Martinez Guillen, 2005].
Total costs were expressed as averages, in cost units of "cost per covado." (See Figure 1 where the unit cost of job order no.
In this paper, we represent arratel with the notation "a." A covado was 0.66 meters and was written [C.sup.do].